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Overdose Death Declines

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Posted on Jul 29, 2019




New overdose study done by Center for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Health Statistics shows overdose death decline. In fact, the United States has collectively been trying to decrease opioid addiction for the past couple of years.

Good news, provisional drug overdose death data shows a decline in opioid overdose and opioid prescriptions between the years 2017 and 2018. In addition medication assisted treatment and overdose-reversing drugs have also started to increase nationwide. It was estimated that there were 68,557 drug overdose deaths in 2018. As well as estimated 47,590 involved opioids, including oxycodone, hydrocodone and morphine. Lastly  31,897 involved synthetic opioids, including fentanyl and tramadol just to name a few.

Furthermore, some of the drugs considered part of the Opioid crisis include prescribed pain relievers, period, and fentanyl states the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Did you know that “21 to 29 percent of patients prescribed opioids for chronic pain misuse them”.

The Opioid Crisis has been going on for a couple of years now. Decreases in overdose deaths is a good sign but should still not be considered a victory states the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. As a result, The National Institute of Health has focused most of their research trying to find safe yet effective alternative strategies for managing chronic pain and new technologies to treat opioid disorders. Finally the National Institute on Drug Abuse has some resources on locating treatment centers, addiction specialist, and Step-by-Step guides if you or a loved one needs information about treatments.

 

To read more about this topics, click the links blow.

Secretary Azar Statement on 2018 Provisional Drug Overdose Death DataU.S. Department of Health & Human Services.https://www.hhs.gov/about/news/2019/07/17/secretary-azar-statement-on-2018-provisional-drug-overdose-death-data.html

Opioid Overdose Crisis. National Institute on Drug Abuse. https://www.drugabuse.gov/drugs-abuse/opioids/opioid-overdose-crisis